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Yellow scours

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ccsheepchampPosted 07/09/10 05:51PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
I've got a 5 month old wether lamb that has yellow scours, almost all liquid with very little solid in it. He was wormed with Valbazen about a week ago.

There haven't been any changes in feed amounts or type. I started wet feeding about two weeks ago but for the last several days the amount of water in the grain hasn't changed. It has recently gotten hot here, mid to high 90's, which is the warmest so far this year.

He's had scours on and off (normal light to medium brown colored) since I got him. I usually treat with scour-halt, but after repeated dosings it's obviously not solving the problem, just treating the symptom. Scour-halt also has a 25 day withdrawl and my last day to give it to him is fast approaching.

What are my options now? Take a fecal sample to the vet? Is it just the heat stressing him? I'm not familair with lambs more than a couple weeks old with yellow scours.

Thanks in advance for the help. I'm nearing the end of my patience with this lamb so any thoughts are welcome.

 
SHADOWRANPosted 07/09/10 06:34PM Send a private email to SHADOWRAN. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
Coccidious maybe? if so treat with Corid, is there any black or brown or red in it?

A fecal sample is always a good ideal if you can but I am not sure if they can teat for everything with it.

jim

 
af32197Posted 07/09/10 07:06PM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:11AM
 
 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/09/10 07:28PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
No blood, it's just yellow. This time.

Yes, a fecal sample has occured to me. Some reasons I have not: Fecal tests are surprisingly expensive through my vet. His office isn't close. He's also limited in livestock experience, more equine oriented.

And there have been temporary reasons in the past for the lamb to develop scours. Change in feed, stress, etc. It's now that the consistancy and color have changed that I am more worried.

 
af32197Posted 07/09/10 07:33PM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:12AM
 
 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/09/10 07:40PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
I'm only finding Sustain boluses for calves, is it off label use?

It would be for future reference anyway, this close to fair I don't know that I could get it before the withdrawl time limitations anyway.

 
af32197Posted 07/09/10 08:04PM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:12AM
 
 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/09/10 08:18PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
Last I heard scours don't disqualify lambs from showing. Perhaps he wouldn't look his best, and the mess certainly isn't a joy to deal with... but even if he doesn't win, he still sells.

 
KyhampbreederPosted 07/09/10 08:25PM Send a private email to Kyhampbreeder. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM

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I agree a fecal test would be ideal but I understand not all areas of the US have vets close enough to use on a regular basis and even more commonly vets that don't treat sheep or want to know how to treat a sheep.
Pretty sure that isn't a problem for John in Illinois though lack of vet guidance is a huge problem in lots of states.
Been around sheep over 50 years now and don't recall any yellow scours in a weaned lamb. Not a lot of help but I'd rule out coccidia and worms. Have you taken a temperature ?
Seems to me a lot of people miss that withdrawal times are for WD prior to slaughter. Lambs aren't slaughtered on show day.

 
KyhampbreederPosted 07/09/10 08:26PM Send a private email to Kyhampbreeder. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM

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I agree a fecal test would be ideal but I understand not all areas of the US have vets close enough to use on a regular basis and even more commonly vets that don't treat sheep or want to know how to treat a sheep.
Pretty sure that isn't a problem for John in Illinois though lack of vet guidance is a huge problem in lots of states.
Been around sheep over 50 years now and don't recall any yellow scours in a weaned lamb. Not a lot of help but I'd rule out coccidia and worms. Have you taken a temperature ?
Seems to me a lot of people miss that withdrawal times are for WD prior to slaughter. Lambs aren't slaughtered on show day.

 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/09/10 08:41PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
I'll take a temp tonight when it cools off Ky.

Our fair rules require the lambs to complete all withdrawls on medication by auction day as some are sent directly to the butcher. I'm basing it off that date.

Someone I trust reccommended I add nutmeg to their feed. Without any concrete ideas on the cause I guess I'll try that tonight and see how it goes over the next few days.

 
af32197Posted 07/09/10 10:09PM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:12AM
 
 
KyhampbreederPosted 07/09/10 10:21PM Send a private email to Kyhampbreeder. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM

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John I find less and less patience myself nearly everyday. I try not to express it in print in the manner I address the computer monitor !

 
af32197Posted 07/09/10 10:26PM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:14AM
 
 
Ladyshrops2Posted 07/09/10 11:40PM Send a private email to Ladyshrops2. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
af- I myself has seen this lamb.. This lamb only has had scours a few times in the amount of time she has had him. He is not sick. He is not suffering and is gaining weight every day. In a month and a half period time she has put 50+lbs on this lamb. I can assure you, after seeing him, once again, he is not suffering. This part of the country we are going thru extreme heat differences-

 
af32197Posted 07/10/10 12:24AM Send a private email to af32197. Changed 07/10/10 07:13AM
 
 
r2jhurstPosted 07/10/10 12:25AM Send a private email to r2jhurst. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM

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it is easier to "learn" and more productive to most.

 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/10/10 05:25AM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
Well his temp is fine. He's acting fine. Running and jumping of his own free will with the other lambs tonight. Eating well despite the heat. I assure you af32197 I wouldn't let any animal I own "suffer," I don't have the stomach for it.

I don't know why he has scours but my vet isn't worth the money to consult about sheep. When I posted I was looking for someone that had seen yellow scours in older lambs, and possibly had a reason for why. The answers I've recived on and off mylamb is what I was looking for and more.

 
SheepSimPosted 07/10/10 08:19AM Send a private email to SheepSim. Changed 07/10/10 08:22AM
In Storey's Guide to Raising Sheep, it says:

"Yellow scours is often associated with overfeeding."

 
EmsoffLambsPosted 07/10/10 09:57AM Send a private email to EmsoffLambs. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
That refers to baby lambs. Never seen yellow scours in an older lamb and really couldn't say what it's from. I think I would go with a fecal test.

 
SHADOWRANPosted 07/10/10 10:27AM Send a private email to SHADOWRAN. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
Been trying to find a answer for you but all I can find is for young lambs, still most of the time it suggest over feeding, but I would suspect maybe a parasite, one artical mentioned Giardia heres some info maybe it will help.

Diarrhea in older lambs and kids
The most common causes of diarrhea in older lambs and kids are coccidiosis and gastro-intestinal parasites (worms). Other major causes of diarrhea in older lambs and kids are clostridium perfringins, rumen acidosis, and nutritional.


Coccidiosis
Coccidosis is a protozoan parasitic disease that is a common cause of diarrhea in lambs and kids. It may also cause subclinical production losses. Lambs and kids are most suceptible to the problem at 1 to 4 months of age, although younger animals may be affected. Lambs are resistant to the disease in their first few weeks of life. Exposure to the protozoa during this time confers immunity and resistance to later infections.

Clinical disease is common after the stress of weaning, feed changes, or shipping. The diarrhea of lambs and kids is usually not bloody, but it may contain blood or mucous and be very watery. Treatment of affected animals includes supportive care and adminstration of coccidiostats. All animals in a group should be treated during an outbreak. Prevention involves improved sanitation and the use of coccidiostats.


Gastro-intestinal worms
The Barber pole worm (Haemonchus contortis) is the major worm species affecting sheep and goats in warm, moist climates that experience summer rainfall. It is not characterized by diarrhea. However, heavy loads of other gastro-intestinal worms can cause diarrhea in sheep and goats: Ostertagia circumcincta (medium or brown stomach worm), Trichostrongylus (bankrupt or hair worm), Coopera sp. (small intestinal worm), and Nematodirus sp. (threadneck worm). Control of gastro-intestinal parasites is best achieved via good pasture, grazing, and animal management, and strategic and/or selective deworming of affected individuals with effective anthelmintics.

Clostridium perfringins
Clostridium perfringins types A, B, C, and D can all cause diarrhea in lambs and kids, though type D is the most common agent. With type D, the onset of neurologic signs followed by sudden death is more common in sheep, whereas goats are more likely to show signs of diarrhea before death. Treatment is rarely effective but consists of aggressive supportive care and administration of the antitoxin.

Clostridium perfringens type C tends to affect very young lambs (<$1 weeks of age) and presents itself as bloody diarrhea, hemorrhagic enteritis, and bloody scours. Clostridial diseases are easily prevented in the young by vaccinating pregnant dams about three weeks prior to delivery and subsequent vaccination of offspring. Consumption of adequate, high quality colostrum is important.

Rumen Acidosis
Acidosis is caused by too much grain or concentrate, which causes a change in rumen acidity and bacteria population. The increase in acid causes an inflammation of the rumen wall and a reduction in the bacteria needed to digest fiber. Symptoms may include depression, off feed, bloat, founder, scours, and occasionally death. Treatment includes drenching with mineral oil or antacids. Acidosis is prevented by proper feeding management. Concentrates (grain) should be introduced to the diet slowly and increased incrementally to give time for the rumen to adjust.

Nutritional
Nutritional scours can be caused by anything that disrupts normal habits. It can also be the result of low intake of dry matter to fluid ratio. A lamb needs to consume at least 2.5 percent of its body weight in dry matter daily. Young or fast growing lambs turned out to pasture must eat large quantities of grass to satisfy their nutritional needs. Green grass is high in moisture. They may develop diarrhea if they aren't getting enough dry matter in their diet.

jim

 
KNS1Posted 07/10/10 08:06PM Send a private email to KNS1. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
I have had a yearling ram get yellow scours like what you have mentioned with your lamb... because at our fair they frown upon animals whith anything but solid stool I pulled him from my show stock and took im off the show ration. After a couple of days he started to have more solid stool, that was on straight grass hay...I dont know if it was because of the rich show feed that I give or if it was because he was getting more feed on the show string than in the flock pens. I wouldnt change anything off of what Im saying because Im not as knowlegeable as most people, but it was my experience.

 
ccsheepchampPosted 07/10/10 08:13PM Send a private email to ccsheepchamp. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
Thanks for posting your experience KNS1. I think you might be right that some lambs/sheep just don't digest show feeds as well as others.


 
bladesclublambsPosted 07/27/11 01:08PM Send a private email to bladesclublambs. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
I have a lamb that has the same problem gave corid for 5 days @ 5cc per dose no change gave a round of anti-biotics made it worse gave yogert for probiotics still no change took the lamb off of top dress that was high protein and gave it a 12oz beer and grass hay we have tryed kaopectat, corid, sul-met,antibiotics, elerctrolytes nothing seems to be working she eats fine does not leave nothing behind im stumped and so is the vet

 
SHADOWRANPosted 07/27/11 02:47PM Send a private email to SHADOWRAN. Changed 00/00/00 12:00AM
old post

 

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